“The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I was surprised that this one (or two, rather) would take me so long to get through. The History of King Lear is actually the "Quarto" text, and The Tragedy of King Lear is the "Folio" text. The Folio came out about 4 years later, and I wish like crazy I'd read that one first. … Continue reading “The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare.

I fondly remember this play, and was more than pleased to revisit it on Christmas (though instead of the fabulous Laurence Fishburne's voice from the 1995 film version, I heard Idris Elba. And why not--the man's excellent!). It's a great tragedy that I'd love to see on the stage over and over again. And without … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare.

“Sir Thomas More,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, (partially) by William Shakespeare

This is the one play I'd say you should read as a dare...at least, the version I have. Which may well be the version everybody has other than the original copies in the great British libraries behind vaults or something. And it's not entirely by Shakespeare, either. Heavily edited and worked on by several people, … Continue reading “Sir Thomas More,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, (partially) by William Shakespeare

Sonnets & ‘A Lover’s Complaint,’ and ‘Various Poems’ from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

Love, death, the muse, the tangled web of attraction, and friendship are probably the most basic subjects covered in Shakespeare's sonnets. One of the most famous ones is the one numbered 18 in this collection, staring with "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day..." Most of the time I think that's the only one … Continue reading Sonnets & ‘A Lover’s Complaint,’ and ‘Various Poems’ from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

“Trolius and Cressida,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

I gotta admit, maybe this was the perfect breaking-point (by accident) in the anthology. I got to resume my reading plans with Shakespeare with this interesting work, Trolius and Cressida. I like how when I took another look online at what the story was about, to see if I got the gist of it or … Continue reading “Trolius and Cressida,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

“Twelfth Night, or What You Will,” From The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Maybe it's just been a bad time, but I tried for two weeks to read and get into this play. I think I should read it again another day, but honestly, I think I'm a bit tired of these "comedies of errors" that keep cropping up. Week after week of romance, pining, mistaken identity, tricks … Continue reading “Twelfth Night, or What You Will,” From The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

The Tragedy of Prince Hamlet, from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

There's so little I can say about Hamlet that hasn't been said by writers far more knowledgeable than myself, and there's a good reason for that. This is the most quoted, borrowed-from, acted play of Shakespeare's that I've come across. Hundreds of writers, actors, directors have used this play as a platform for fame or … Continue reading The Tragedy of Prince Hamlet, from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“As You Like It,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Well, I hadn't heard much about this play, though it contains a lot of familiar Shakespeare-isms and a few quotes that will ring bells. I don't think I've ever heard of a performance of this play, or any enthusiasts, though I've heard the names Orlando and Rosalind before. As You Like It is one of … Continue reading “As You Like It,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“Julius Caesar,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I have to say, maybe the story's so well known that it makes this play easier to understand than I thought it would be. Now I'm wondering why we never read the complete play when I was in school, though every 10th grader had to deal with it. Guess the teachers thought the parts after … Continue reading “Julius Caesar,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare