The Inquisitive “mile”: re-tackling questions #076-100 (& more below)

Well, it took two and three-fourths years, but I definitely hit the 100 questions which were one of the main reasons I started this blog (general stuff and book reviews were the others). Of course, I have a couple thousand more rattling around in the noggin, so don't be surprised as the numbers just keep … Continue reading The Inquisitive “mile”: re-tackling questions #076-100 (& more below)

I forgot what it was like to argue with a Trump supporter… til tonight.

I suppose it's a natural consequence of not wanting to talk on the phone so late (and trying to relax after getting bitten by dozens of mosquitoes while working outside). I just lost my cool and all the issues that've been coming up lately--the abortion-bans, creationist rhetoric, etc.--burst out of me. My dad's friend called … Continue reading I forgot what it was like to argue with a Trump supporter… til tonight.

“The Tragedy of Coriolanus,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I think Coriolanus has the longest Act 1 I've read so far, but the long setup is useful--and needed--in setting up the characters and the situation in a dwindling Rome. Coriolanus begins with citizens griping about the recent famine and grain stores of the wealthy which are full. They call one of them out, Martius … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Coriolanus,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

#082–Blitz Q: Border Walls and Maracas, or, What. The. Actual. Hell. Is. Wrong. With. These. Teachers???!!!

I first saw this last night before I was closing up and showed a teacher who was with me. Our jaws dropped and my co-worker was nearly apoplectic. I can't blame her. When it comes to Halloween, don't get me wrong: I might lean liberal, but I don't clutch my pearls over bad taste or … Continue reading #082–Blitz Q: Border Walls and Maracas, or, What. The. Actual. Hell. Is. Wrong. With. These. Teachers???!!!

#077 Adopted Q: Is it the American Dream, or the American Myth?– American Society Would Collapse If It Weren’t for These 8 Myths, by Lee Camp

I’ve had this question in mind a long time, and found an article that tries to give some well thought out answers in a concise way.

I personally don’t know how I feel about all the points brought up–yet–but EVERY ONE OF THEM deserves hefty contemplation.

There’s a reason plenty of people have been shaking their heads and saying “this doesn’t feel like my country anymore,” after all.

So, without further ado, I’ll let L.C. take it from here.

Rise Up Times

Worldwide, one in 10 people only make $2 a day. Do you know how long it would take one of those people to make the same amount as Jeff Bezos has? 193 million years. (If they only buy single-ply toilet paper.) Put simply, you cannot comprehend the level of inequality in our current world or even just our nation.

studiostoks / Shutterstock

By Lee Camp  Truthdig  TD ORIGINALS  July 25, 2018

Our society should’ve collapsed by now. You know that, right?

No society should function with this level of inequality (with the possible exception of one of those prison planets in a “Star Wars” movie). Sixty-three percent of Americans can’t afford a $500 emergency. Yet Amazon head Jeff Bezos is now worth a record $141 billion. He could literally end world hunger for multiple years and still have more money left over than he could ever spend on himself.

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“Julius Caesar,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I have to say, maybe the story's so well known that it makes this play easier to understand than I thought it would be. Now I'm wondering why we never read the complete play when I was in school, though every 10th grader had to deal with it. Guess the teachers thought the parts after … Continue reading “Julius Caesar,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

An Introduction to Film Analysis: Technique and Meaning in Narrative Film, by Michael Ryan & Melissa Lenos

My Copy: 9780826430021 (image from Bloomsbury publishing, though there are two different covers, it seems) I'm not sure how long ago I bought this skinny textbook, but I've thumbed through it a few times for my master's thesis. I know that's the main reason I bought it. As someone wanting to learn more about film-making, … Continue reading An Introduction to Film Analysis: Technique and Meaning in Narrative Film, by Michael Ryan & Melissa Lenos

“The History of Henry the Fourth (1 Henry IV),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I'd love to know what it is about Shakespeare and his unique ability to make kings into secondary characters in their own stories. Well, perhaps it's because he was too busy thinking up Henry V that he had to throw some of it in here first, lest he lose all his ideas. I just find … Continue reading “The History of Henry the Fourth (1 Henry IV),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s English Kings: History, Chronicle, and Drama (2nd ed.), by Peter Saccio

My Copy: 9780195123197 (image from goodreads.com) NOTE: I'm interrupting the flow of my The Oxford Shakespeare reviews because this month's been hell on concentration (between jobs, sleep-deprivation, jury duty, and an ER visit). So instead I decided to review a Shakespeare-related book for this weekend that I'd just finished instead of posting it at the … Continue reading Shakespeare’s English Kings: History, Chronicle, and Drama (2nd ed.), by Peter Saccio