Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement That Shamed a Generation of Young Women & How I Broke Free, by Linda Kay Klein

My Copy: 9781501124815 (image from bn.com) I spent all yesterday finishing this book and thinking about it. It's not the best non-fiction book I've read, but it had so much that made me think, and made me want to research more. Pure... is self-explanatory. The author uses much of her own experiences to talk about … Continue reading Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement That Shamed a Generation of Young Women & How I Broke Free, by Linda Kay Klein

Need to get the foot out of my mouth (that’s where the clarinet goes, dammit)

For once, the "To-Do List Monster" has kept quiet and not reared it's ugly head too often the past couple of months. Busy, busy, busy, and still not much of a to-do list. I never thought that'd make things worse as far as long-term goals went. Surprisingly, my most common procrastination method is more helpful … Continue reading Need to get the foot out of my mouth (that’s where the clarinet goes, dammit)

“All’s Well That Ends Well,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I know I've griped about "mistaken identity" comedies in several Shakespeare posts by now, but this one's definitely different than the rest. The motives are simple and the need for identity swap is more intelligent than I think I've seen in the other Shakespearean comedies. The biggest draw has to be the heroine, Helen. She's … Continue reading “All’s Well That Ends Well,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I suppose we can chalk the negativity you're about to read to some kind of "law of higher expectations." I expected to like this play, because I love history and I've read and heard a lot about Cleopatra and Marc Antony since I was young. Yes, everything was contradictory between fiction and non-fiction, and sources … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Sonnets & ‘A Lover’s Complaint,’ and ‘Various Poems’ from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

Love, death, the muse, the tangled web of attraction, and friendship are probably the most basic subjects covered in Shakespeare's sonnets. One of the most famous ones is the one numbered 18 in this collection, staring with "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day..." Most of the time I think that's the only one … Continue reading Sonnets & ‘A Lover’s Complaint,’ and ‘Various Poems’ from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

“Trolius and Cressida,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

I gotta admit, maybe this was the perfect breaking-point (by accident) in the anthology. I got to resume my reading plans with Shakespeare with this interesting work, Trolius and Cressida. I like how when I took another look online at what the story was about, to see if I got the gist of it or … Continue reading “Trolius and Cressida,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

“As You Like It,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Well, I hadn't heard much about this play, though it contains a lot of familiar Shakespeare-isms and a few quotes that will ring bells. I don't think I've ever heard of a performance of this play, or any enthusiasts, though I've heard the names Orlando and Rosalind before. As You Like It is one of … Continue reading “As You Like It,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare