Sunday, Boring Sunday: God, Guns, Family, Friends, & Paranoia… I’ve had enough.

First of all: This re-reading the Bible thing is going to take a LOOOONNNNG time. I'm not even halfway through Genesis and I've already got about 10 pages of notes and questions. Yes, I'm taking the Bible for what it is, reading it in order. All I can say is I'm remembering why I got … Continue reading Sunday, Boring Sunday: God, Guns, Family, Friends, & Paranoia… I’ve had enough.

“Measure for Measure,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Apologies--internet went out or this would've been posted late Christmas Day for my "12 days of Shakespeare". Anyhoo... Measure for Measure is probably the best of the plays featuring complex scheming and bait-and-switch that I've read so far. I love the characters for the most part, even the despicable ones because their nature is quite … Continue reading “Measure for Measure,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

My Christian Childhood & How it Might Have Helped Screw Up My Adulthood: A Theory.

I was reading an atheist's post earlier today and it got me thinking about issues I have trouble with regarding my family and my own beliefs. To be more precise, trouble regarding my upbringing with parent-approved, pre-packaged beliefs dropped into my brain. Mom-approved would be even-more precise. Dad was never religious and I don't think … Continue reading My Christian Childhood & How it Might Have Helped Screw Up My Adulthood: A Theory.

“Love’s Labour’s Lost” and “Love’s Labour’s Won (A Brief Account),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

As much as I wanted to read and understand the plays when I was in school--and forced to learn Shakespeare--I'm having a bit of a tough time with enjoying any of them at the moment...especially this one Love's Labour's Lost is another comedic play, but more difficult for me to get into than The Comedy … Continue reading “Love’s Labour’s Lost” and “Love’s Labour’s Won (A Brief Account),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare