When “you get what you pay for” means you’ve lost not just money, but time as well.

I wasn't feeling very good today, just general tiredness from the storm the night before waking me up several times. I finished most of my notebook regarding plants I'm working with and any specs and instructions I can find on them, and then went to check on what I already had planted versus what was … Continue reading When “you get what you pay for” means you’ve lost not just money, but time as well.

Q#120–Why are a lot of Americans squeamish about moms breast-feeding babies in public?

At least, it sure seems that way in the media, but the more I read, the more it's about 50/50 in negative and positive coverage and reactions. This is something I can't understand, because you have to feed the baby when it's hungry, and breastfeeding is one way to do it. In the evolutionary sense, … Continue reading Q#120–Why are a lot of Americans squeamish about moms breast-feeding babies in public?

Abandon Ship!: The saga of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, the Navy’s greatest sea disaster, by Richard F. Newcomb (with intro & afterward by Peter Maas)

My Copy: 9780060184711 (image from bn.com) Ever since I was a little kid, and Jaws was my favorite movie (still is, actually), I've been curious about sharks and Naval ships. That began with the scene of Quint telling about the Indianapolis disaster. I don't care if I've seen it 200+ times, I will stop what … Continue reading Abandon Ship!: The saga of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, the Navy’s greatest sea disaster, by Richard F. Newcomb (with intro & afterward by Peter Maas)

“The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I suppose we can chalk the negativity you're about to read to some kind of "law of higher expectations." I expected to like this play, because I love history and I've read and heard a lot about Cleopatra and Marc Antony since I was young. Yes, everything was contradictory between fiction and non-fiction, and sources … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare