Republicans Did Their Homework

While I’m a big believer in the concept of fair play, when one side writes their own rules while trying to tear the “everybody” rules to pieces, it’s time for the other side to do something else. You can’t explain or reason with a hungry cannibal; it’s gonna tear you to pieces.

REBLOG from Armchair Observer Two.

https://armchair.blog/2020/12/05/republicans-did-their-homework/

Armchair Observer Two

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I’m angry at the Republicans for their concerted campaign to destroy what they feel is the America that liberals made, and replace it with America as they feel it should be, as they believe our forefathers imagined it. If it feels like they are tearing down our legacy of laws and traditions that is because they are. Who could they get that was more suited than Trump to the task of deconstructing America? Republicans are calling their reset ‘originalism,’ ‘federalism’ – names that conjure images of our revolutionary roots and which sound patriotic. ‘Originalism’ is impossible to channel, so, unless you have a time machine, what we have is someone’s interpretation of originalism, most likely originalism as defined by the Federalist Society. George Washington was a Federalist. He fought for a strong central government. The modern Federalist Society says that States Rights have been…

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“The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

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