“All’s Well That Ends Well,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I know I've griped about "mistaken identity" comedies in several Shakespeare posts by now, but this one's definitely different than the rest. The motives are simple and the need for identity swap is more intelligent than I think I've seen in the other Shakespearean comedies. The biggest draw has to be the heroine, Helen. She's … Continue reading “All’s Well That Ends Well,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I suppose we can chalk the negativity you're about to read to some kind of "law of higher expectations." I expected to like this play, because I love history and I've read and heard a lot about Cleopatra and Marc Antony since I was young. Yes, everything was contradictory between fiction and non-fiction, and sources … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“Macbeth,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Ah, definitely one of my favorite plays, if only for its intense mockability and length. Oh, and should I say "the Scottish play" instead? I already asked what the hell that was about in this question post, but for the sake of fun, read and feel free to watch that Blackadder segment I linked to … Continue reading “Macbeth,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I was surprised that this one (or two, rather) would take me so long to get through. The History of King Lear is actually the "Quarto" text, and The Tragedy of King Lear is the "Folio" text. The Folio came out about 4 years later, and I wish like crazy I'd read that one first. … Continue reading “The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“Measure for Measure,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Apologies--internet went out or this would've been posted late Christmas Day for my "12 days of Shakespeare". Anyhoo... Measure for Measure is probably the best of the plays featuring complex scheming and bait-and-switch that I've read so far. I love the characters for the most part, even the despicable ones because their nature is quite … Continue reading “Measure for Measure,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I’m having 16,000 second thoughts about the “family moving in” thing, & I’m hoping like hell it’s not too late…

I think that number's about accurate. I had the thoughts coming in the past few days, but I've been so exhausted I haven't had a chance to think properly. They came to a head yesterday with a crying and screaming fit that worked me into a near migraine. First of all, I was avoiding the … Continue reading I’m having 16,000 second thoughts about the “family moving in” thing, & I’m hoping like hell it’s not too late…

My Christian Childhood & How it Might Have Helped Screw Up My Adulthood: A Theory.

I was reading an atheist's post earlier today and it got me thinking about issues I have trouble with regarding my family and my own beliefs. To be more precise, trouble regarding my upbringing with parent-approved, pre-packaged beliefs dropped into my brain. Mom-approved would be even-more precise. Dad was never religious and I don't think … Continue reading My Christian Childhood & How it Might Have Helped Screw Up My Adulthood: A Theory.

“Much Ado About Nothing,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I can't really say much about this particular play because I saw the Branagh film from 1993 before I read it, so I've got scenes from that one stuck in my head. I watched it in Lit class in high school and have to admit I enjoyed the hell out of it. Who woulda thought? … Continue reading “Much Ado About Nothing,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare