2020 Feels Like a Badly-Written Disaster/Political Thriller Movie

Pic from MAD Magazine (definitely fitting). If a human hand put this together, 2020 might just be a fusion disaster movie/ political (thriller?) screenplay that's been rejected 30 times for being too long, too outlandish, too boring, too stupid to exist. Something even Roland Emmerich or Michael Bay would roll their eyes and pass up … Continue reading 2020 Feels Like a Badly-Written Disaster/Political Thriller Movie

A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice & Fire #5), by George R. R. Martin

My Copy: 9780553582017 (image from bn.com) I can't believe it took me over two months to finish this book. I actually read the last two hundred pages last night because I was so eager to get through them and I couldn't sleep, so why not? The action increased its pace nicely with some quiet moments … Continue reading A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice & Fire #5), by George R. R. Martin

“Trolius and Cressida,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

I gotta admit, maybe this was the perfect breaking-point (by accident) in the anthology. I got to resume my reading plans with Shakespeare with this interesting work, Trolius and Cressida. I like how when I took another look online at what the story was about, to see if I got the gist of it or … Continue reading “Trolius and Cressida,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by William Shakespeare

“Much Ado About Nothing,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I can't really say much about this particular play because I saw the Branagh film from 1993 before I read it, so I've got scenes from that one stuck in my head. I watched it in Lit class in high school and have to admit I enjoyed the hell out of it. Who woulda thought? … Continue reading “Much Ado About Nothing,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Merry Wives of Windsor,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

This one's probably the easiest play to read, other than Romeo and Juliet, so far. I have to say I really got into it and it wasn't overly complex as far as the action goes. That could be because Shakespeare intended it to be a contemporary story for his contemporary audience, and didn't have to … Continue reading “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare