2020 Feels Like a Badly-Written Disaster/Political Thriller Movie

Pic from MAD Magazine (definitely fitting). If a human hand put this together, 2020 might just be a fusion disaster movie/ political (thriller?) screenplay that's been rejected 30 times for being too long, too outlandish, too boring, too stupid to exist. Something even Roland Emmerich or Michael Bay would roll their eyes and pass up … Continue reading 2020 Feels Like a Badly-Written Disaster/Political Thriller Movie

Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe Mysteries, by Robert Goldsborough

My Copy: 9781453270974 (image from bn.com) Now, I have to admit, when I love a series and an author, I generally love that particular series as written by THAT author. Maybe I'm biased against other writers tackling a beloved series or character once the creator has retired or passed on, but I swear I'll feel … Continue reading Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe Mysteries, by Robert Goldsborough

“The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I suppose we can chalk the negativity you're about to read to some kind of "law of higher expectations." I expected to like this play, because I love history and I've read and heard a lot about Cleopatra and Marc Antony since I was young. Yes, everything was contradictory between fiction and non-fiction, and sources … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

#079–What’s the Big Deal about the film “Apocalypse Now” (1979)?

I've seen it probably a couple dozen times by now. Hell, for some reason I've watched Apocalypse Now every night for a week, I'm guessing as some morbid therapy to show me some people arguably having a far worse month than I. Except for Kilgore (Robert Duvall), of course. I know I like the film, … Continue reading #079–What’s the Big Deal about the film “Apocalypse Now” (1979)?

Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror, by Steve Alten

My Copy: 055357910x (image from fab lexile)** Those who loved the book Jaws probably hate the success of this book (at least, that's what some Goodreads reviewers seem to think when the word "Jaws" is written). I wrote my own review of Jaws (the book) a year ago--feel free to read it right here. Anyhoo-- Meg is … Continue reading Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror, by Steve Alten

“The History of Henry the Fourth (1 Henry IV),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I'd love to know what it is about Shakespeare and his unique ability to make kings into secondary characters in their own stories. Well, perhaps it's because he was too busy thinking up Henry V that he had to throw some of it in here first, lest he lose all his ideas. I just find … Continue reading “The History of Henry the Fourth (1 Henry IV),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Fer-De-Lance, by Rex Stout

My Copy: 9780553278194 (image by goodreads.com) The first Nero Wolfe novel, and one of the best stories. Rex Stout wrote many short stories and novellas since this first one in 1934, but this introductory glimpse into the world of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin (his literal leg-man) is too much fun, with enough twists and … Continue reading Fer-De-Lance, by Rex Stout

The Maltese Falcon, by Dashiell Hammett

My Copy: 9780679722649 (Image from bookcoverarchive.com) Okay, if you've seen the classic film with Humphrey Bogart, then you've basically got the story down. I love this book. I've read it twice now and will be keeping this one on the shelves in my writer's hall-of-fame. I can't help it. Much like the film itself, the … Continue reading The Maltese Falcon, by Dashiell Hammett

The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky

My Copy: 9781566195546 (image scanned by me) The Brothers Karamazov is Dostoevsky's last work, and tells the story of four brothers (3 legitimate, 1 not) who have been raised apart most of their lives and come together back at home with their disgraceful father. At some point, the father is murdered, and one of these … Continue reading The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky