“The Tragedy of Coriolanus,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I think Coriolanus has the longest Act 1 I've read so far, but the long setup is useful--and needed--in setting up the characters and the situation in a dwindling Rome. Coriolanus begins with citizens griping about the recent famine and grain stores of the wealthy which are full. They call one of them out, Martius … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Coriolanus,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“Pericles (A Reconstructed Text of Pericles, Prince of Tyre),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

NOTE: We're nearing the end of the book--just a few more plays to go. My water heater suddenly started pouring water out of an element panel and it took a few days for the cleanup, electrical tests, and replacement to be finished. I figured I'd play catch up to get the book reviews finished, but … Continue reading “Pericles (A Reconstructed Text of Pericles, Prince of Tyre),” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“All’s Well That Ends Well,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I know I've griped about "mistaken identity" comedies in several Shakespeare posts by now, but this one's definitely different than the rest. The motives are simple and the need for identity swap is more intelligent than I think I've seen in the other Shakespearean comedies. The biggest draw has to be the heroine, Helen. She's … Continue reading “All’s Well That Ends Well,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I suppose we can chalk the negativity you're about to read to some kind of "law of higher expectations." I expected to like this play, because I love history and I've read and heard a lot about Cleopatra and Marc Antony since I was young. Yes, everything was contradictory between fiction and non-fiction, and sources … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“Macbeth,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Ah, definitely one of my favorite plays, if only for its intense mockability and length. Oh, and should I say "the Scottish play" instead? I already asked what the hell that was about in this question post, but for the sake of fun, read and feel free to watch that Blackadder segment I linked to … Continue reading “Macbeth,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

I was surprised that this one (or two, rather) would take me so long to get through. The History of King Lear is actually the "Quarto" text, and The Tragedy of King Lear is the "Folio" text. The Folio came out about 4 years later, and I wish like crazy I'd read that one first. … Continue reading “The Tragedy (History) of King Lear” (Folio & Quarto Text), from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

“The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare.

I fondly remember this play, and was more than pleased to revisit it on Christmas (though instead of the fabulous Laurence Fishburne's voice from the 1995 film version, I heard Idris Elba. And why not--the man's excellent!). It's a great tragedy that I'd love to see on the stage over and over again. And without … Continue reading “The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare.

“Measure for Measure,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Apologies--internet went out or this would've been posted late Christmas Day for my "12 days of Shakespeare". Anyhoo... Measure for Measure is probably the best of the plays featuring complex scheming and bait-and-switch that I've read so far. I love the characters for the most part, even the despicable ones because their nature is quite … Continue reading “Measure for Measure,” from The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by W. Shakespeare

Beyond Einstein: The Cosmic Quest for the theory of the Universe

My Copy: 9780385477819 (image from bn.com) I've always wanted to understand science better, and I've been impressed with Michio Kaku's approach to explaining it in documentaries and whatnot. I had to tackle his explanations in book form, and began with this one. Beyond Einstein gives more than the theory of relativity that we've been used … Continue reading Beyond Einstein: The Cosmic Quest for the theory of the Universe